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Forest restoration - Our secret weapon for achieving the Paris Agreement targets

 
To reach the Paris Agreement temperature target of limiting temperature rise to 1.5 degrees we must preserve and restore forests. On 16 November 2017 our event looked at how forest restoration can be undertaken in a way that protects local people’s rights and consider ways to mobilise finances for protection and restoration. The event was organised by Fern and Rainforest Foundation Norway at the Indigenous Peoples Pavilion during the international climate negotiations in Bonn (COP23).
 
Speakers highlighted the need for forest restoration to limit global warming, the risks and possibilities linked to restoration especially from the point of view of local people and the need to reverse financial flows to allow forests to contribute to climate action.
 
- Kevin Anderson, Manchester University: Why we need negative emissions
 
 
- Kate Dooley, Melbourne University: How can forests contribute to generating
negative emissions?
 
- Julia Christian, Fern: Forest restoration and respect for local people's rights
 
 
- Charlie Parker, independent consultant: Financing forest climate Action
 
 
Comments to presentation were given by Inka-Saara Arttijeff (Adviser to the President of the Sami Parliament of Finland) and Emmy Primadona (Indonesian Community Conservation, KKI WARSI). Arttijeff pointed out to the serious impacts that logging in Sami area has to the climate and the livelihoods of indigenous Sami reindeer herders and the role of land rights in securing multiple benefits (See also Fern report Arctic Limits). Primadona highlighted the results that have occurred when needs of local communities are recognised and restoration is linked to livelihoods.