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Bioenergy

Fern’s aim is to limit the EU’s industrial use of wood for energy

Fern’s analysis: Whilst the need to reduce fossil fuel use is clear, some alternatives, such as large scale biomass use can be as bad for the environment, the climate and people. Wood has always been an important source of energy, for local and traditional uses, but in recent years ‘biomass’ has been promoted by the EU on a large industrial scale as a ‘renewable energy source’. This has put an increasing pressure on forests and people in Europe and globally.

The EU is presently considering how it can meet a new target of having at least 27 per cent of energy from renewable sources by 2030. Great caution will need to be applied if biomass is to be considered as part of that energy mix. Forests have an important climate function, and wood is a scarce natural resource which emits greenhouse gas emissions when burned for energy. This negative effect is not matched by the climate benefits that the biomass sector claims. Plus, partly because of a lack of EU rules, the sourcing, production and use of biomass currently cause negative environmental and social impacts.

The present EU renewable energy policy drives demands for wood, in an era where land and forests are already under pressure by increasing hunger for natural resources for the production of food and materials. If the EU is to meet its aim of halting deforestation by 2030, it cannot continue to subsidise demand for yet another commodity that drives deforestation: biomass.

What Fern is doing: Fern investigates the impacts of biomass use in Europe and globally, and explores ways how EU policies should respond to the concerns associated with biomass production and use. Fern promotes civil society dialogue on how to achieve a socially and environmentally sustainable EU climate and energy policy.

To learn more about this campaign: the best documents to read are "Burning Matter", "Biomass Report shows increasing lack of policy coherence on forest protection", "Increased use of biomass: recommendations for ensuring it is environmentally responsible and socially just", "Volunteering for disaster: why biomass criteria must be ambitious and legally binding" and "Woody Biomass for Energy: NGO Concerns and Recommendations".

 

Most recent publications

Biofuels are not a way to decarbonise aviation

This letter to Commissioner Bulc explains why NGOs are concerned about his statement that “Biofuels are the ‘best choice’ at this point to start to decarbonize the industry”. Relying on large-scale biofuel cultivation leads to more environmental damage. The only way Europe’s aviation policy can help meet Paris Agreement goals is to focus on reducing demand.

European Commission grants Drax a license to destroy forests at public’s expense

The UK’s biggest power station Drax can continue destroying forests and releasing greenhouse gas emissions at the taxpayer’s expense, after the European Commission today approved millions of pounds of additional UK renewable energy subsidies to the energy company for burning wood instead of coal.

This press release from five NGOs, including Fern, who disagree with the decision.

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PDF iconDrax PR386.69 KB

NGO comments to European Commission investigation in to UK state aid to Drax power plan

In January of this year, the European Commission launched an investigation into whether the UK government’s financial support for Drax to convert part of its coal power plant to operate on biomass breaches the European Union’s rules on state aid.

How to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals? Focus on forests

In September 2015, world governments adopted an Agenda for Sustainable Development with 17 universal Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be achieved by 2030. The aims are noble and daunting – end all forms of poverty, fight inequality, address climate change, and ensure that no one is left behind.

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PDF iconFocus on forests.pdf401.04 KB

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