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Forests and climate: Presentations

Presentations from negative emissions seminar

This seminar held in May 2016 brought key scientists together with environmental, development and human rights NGOs to understand the Paris Agreement’s implications for forests and land use. A final report of the meeting gives an overview of discussions and presentations given.

 

 

 

Presentations were:

Brendan Mackey, Griffith University, Australia: What role do forests play in the forest carbon cycle?

Sivan Kartha, Stockholm Environment Institute: IPCC scenarios and negative emissions assumptions

Tim Searchinger, Princeton University: IPCC scenarios and bioenergy assumptions

Kate Dooley, University of Melbourne: Potential impacts (ecological, biophysical, social) from scaled up negative emissions and bioenergy

Almuth Ernsting, Biofuelwatch: Could BECCS remove CO2 from the atmosphere?

Kevin Andersen, Tyndall Centre: What does a 1.5°C scenario without negative emissions look like?

After presentations and discussions, participants agreed on the following priorities:

  • Urgent need to reduce emissions
  • Urgent need to increase carbon sequestration in land and forests
  • Forests and land do not offset fossil fuel emissions
  • Redefine ‘negative emissions’

REDD, FLEGT and carbon trading – a six part training course

It is not that easy to get to grips with Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD) or carbon trading without some prior knowledge; the fairly complex ideas are usually shrouded in even more complex technical language and jargon. This series of six training presentations is designed to give an accessible overview to some of the key concepts behind international discussions on carbon trading, REDD and Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT).  Although each presentation can be viewed alone, the entire course should give anyone a good overall understanding of the issues, and it is hoped that it will be particularly useful for community groups and local NGOs faced with engaging in REDD or forest governance schemes. The course was funded by the Congo Basin Forest Fund and has been translated into French and Spanish.

1. What is Climate Change?

The first part of the course, ‘What is climate change?’ sets out the problem that REDD and carbon trading are supposed to address. It explains the role of carbon and fossil fuel emissions in climate change, making it clear that reducing deforestation will not solve the problems.

 

 

 

2. What is REDD?

Having debunked the idea that avoiding deforestation will solve climate change, the second presentation begins by highlighting the very important benefits that will come from tackling rampant deforestation. The major international proposal to tackle deforestation is REDD, and this module covers the fundamental problems identified with the REDD right from the start. We also introduce REDD+, touching on the need for safeguards to protect communities.

3. What is Carbon Trading?

The concept of Cap and Trade as a means to efficiently reduce carbon emissions is explored here, with a nod to the EU Emissions Trading System, the first only up and running cap and trade scheme (others are now running in New Zealand and Eastern States of the USA). Carbon offsets are introduced, highlighting some of the key difficulties and making it clear that offsets are, at best, benign and at worst undermine the entire cap and trade system. Forest carbon offsets are picked out as particularly problematic.

4. Role of forests in climate change?

Module four takes a more detailed look at the role of forests in climate change mitigation activities. Addressing one of the major issues within REDD – who is going to pay for it – this module draws together information from the previous two presentations to show that REDD is intimately tied up with carbon trading. With this in mind, we explore some of the key problems encountered by the existing voluntary carbon market.

5. REDD+ and communities

Beginning with clarification on what is generally meant by rightsholders and stakeholders, this section focuses on the role of communities in tackling deforestation. Key concepts including good governance and free prior informed consent (FPIC) are introduced as necessary factors in any attempt to tackle deforestation.

6. Lessons from FLEGT for REDD

The final section of this course introduces the EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Voluntary Partnership Agreements. This programme to improve forest governance has some real lessons to offer any future REDD scheme, in that it aims to tackle the key causes of deforestation by involving stakeholders, encouraging transparency and building the capacity of local communities. We conclude with a reminder that neither REDD nor FLEGT address the single most important factor in deforestation – demand for forest and agricultural products. This final module also includes a recap of the entire course.

Lessons from FLEGT for REDD

More PowerPoint presentations from FERN

This is the final presentation in FERN's six module course. To see module five please click here.

Communities and REDD+

The fifth of FERN's presentations, to see module four, click here, to see module six click here.

Role of forests in climate change

The fourth of FERN's presentations, to see module three, click here, to see module five click here.

What is carbon trading?

The third of FERN's presentations, to see module two, click here, to see module four click here.

What is REDD?

The second of FERN's presentations on FLEGT, REDD and carbon trading. To see module one click here, to see module three click here.

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Most recent publications

One step forward, two steps back for EU on climate and forests

Today, the European Parliament took one step forward and two steps back for the climate and forests.

Read the full Press Release

On a positive front, the Environment Committee voted to strengthen the EU’s climate target for the Effort Sharing Regulation (ESR) - which covers the agriculture, waste, buildings and transport sectors - by reducing the amount of ‘LULUCF offsets’ they had access to by 90 million tons of CO2.

‘Climate heroes’ lobby for forest rules that could break the Paris Agreement

The fight against global warming is being threatened by countries renowned for their green credentials, according to the new website www.LULUCF.org set up by a group of environmental NGOs.

Climate Action in the Land Sector: Treading carefully

This policy brief explains how and why Post-Paris climate negotiations can and should build effective climate action, without threatening human rights and natural ecosystems.

Arctic Limits: How Finland’s forest policies threaten the Sámi and the climate

Finland is a test case in the fight against climate change. As the world edges closer to breaching the Paris Agreement goal of keeping global temperature rises below 2 degrees, forests have become increasingly important in discussions around how to battle climate change. Yet accounting for emissions from the forests sector is devilishly complex and riddled with loopholes.

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PDF iconArctic Limits_Final.pdf1.77 MB

Blog: Analysis of draft LULUCF reports

By Hannah Mowat

The recently-published draft reports of the Land Use Land Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) regulation give an indication of which direction the different committees’ rapporteurs would like to take the file. Here we offer a quick overview of the main highlights and lowlights:

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