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What are negative emissions?

Most proposals to limit global temperature rises to well below 2° Celsius rely on ‘negative emissions’ – the removal of carbon from the atmosphere.

This can be done naturally, such as by protecting and restoring degraded forests so they become carbon sinks. Some also claim that it can be done through geo-engineering, for instance by burning bioenergy, capturing the carbon released, and pumping it into underground geological reservoirs. This is known as Bioenergy, Carbon, Capture and Storage (BECCS).

Fern believes there are three main risks in relying on geo-engineering projects:

  1. They are used as an excuse to keep burning fossil fuels despite unproven benefits
  2. They will have unacceptable ecological and social impacts if used at an industrial scale
  3. They cannot ensure stored carbon is not released through human or natural forces, including climate change

For more information see the outcomes of a meeting Fern hosted on negative emissions.

Most recent publications

Going beyond 40% - options to ensure LULUCF maintains high environmental integrity of the EU climate and energy package

As the ratification process for the Paris Climate Agreement begins, a new study produced by the Oeko-Institut for Fern has shown how the EU’s new policy on land and forests could help it to be more ambitious on its climate change targets, and set a positive precedent globally by developing a separate pillar - with its own target - for the so-called LULUCF sector.

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PDF iconLULUCF_target_Oeko_report221.48 KB

EU land and forests can help EU be more ambitious on climate, new study shows

As the ratification process for the Paris Agreement begins, a new study shows how the EU’s new policy on land and forests could help the EU be more ambitious given the Commission’s reluctance to increase climate targets.

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PDF iconLULUCF_target_press_release268.42 KB

Double Jeopardy: coal's threat to forests

Coal is the single biggest contributor to man-made climate change, while deforestation accounts for up to one-sixth of CO2 emissions. So when forests are torn down to make way for coal mines the danger to the planet intensifies.

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PDF iconCoalForest_Report.pdf885.29 KB

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