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What role should land and forests play in the Paris agreement?

A new briefing paper issued at the start of the Paris climate talks says that restoring degraded forests can meet the world’s need to remove emissions from the atmosphere, if fossil fuel emissions are simultaneously brought to zero by 2050, and that forest communities should play a central role in this restoration. The briefing, co-written by Fern with the Rainforest Foundation Norway and Friends of the Earth Norway, also rejects the need for dangerous carbon dioxide removal such as Bioenergy Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) and large-scale plantations.

Read our press release on this briefing here.

Mending the circle – How the Circular Economy could work for forests

As the European Commission considers an ambitious strategy that can spur a circular economy in the EU, Fern has prepared a position paper on how to break the ‘take-make-use-dispose’ model in favour of one that re-uses, repairs, refurbishes and recycles – and outlines the role that forests can play.

PDF icon briefing_circular_economy254.71 KB

EU Investors, Land Grabs and Deforestation: Case-Studies

European banks and investors are a major source of finance for large-scale destructive agriculture; forestry; and pulp and paper projects. These often lead to forest loss, impoverishment and violations of the rights of local communities. NGOs continue to be inundated with examples of agriculture and forestry deals that kick communities off their land and cause environmental devastation.

Who takes the credit? REDD+ in a post-2020 UN climate agreement

This briefing note addresses the risks that could arise if Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) were to be included in an international climate agreement. Specifically, it looks at ‘double-counting’, where two countries claim the same emission reduction.

PDF icon Who takes the credit.pdf749.05 KB

EU consumption and illegal deforestation

Half of all tropical deforestation since 2000 has been caused by illegal clearance of forests for commercial agriculture. Fern’s new study, summarised here, suggests that the EU is one of the largest importers of products resulting from illegal deforestation. The report makes calculations in terms of forest lost as well as value of goods traded.

Beyond biodiversity offsetting; trading away community rights in Gabon

This is the fourth in a series of briefing notes outlining concerns and considerations related to global proposals to offset biodiversity loss. This briefing note analyses a dangerous new proposal being discussed in Gabon for a new Sustainable Development Law (SDL) which goes even further than biodiversity offset schemes outlined so far.

PDF icon Trading away rights.pdf906.63 KB